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Forty five years ago, Apollo missions brought twelve men -and Mankind- on the surface of another world, the Moon.
In 2017, fifteen teams are competing for a massive come back on our Satellite.

One of them will also safeguard precious information for the far-off future.

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Frozen Testimonies

« Here Man completed his first explorations of the Moon, December 1972 AD. May the spirit of peace in which we came be reflected in the lives of all mankind. »

Those were the words engraved on a plaque attached to the ladder of the Apollo 17 Lunar Module (LEM).

On December 14th 1972, Gene Cernan scribbled his daughter’s initials in the Moon dust of Taurus Littrow and then joined geologist Harrison Schmitt in the LEM. A few minutes later, the take off of the last men who walked on the Moon, was captured by a remotely controlled video camera placed on the rover.

Materials
left on the surface
will remain intact

Lunar Rovers, LEM Descent Stages, American flags were left behind by the astronauts of six Apollo missions. With very little erosion, those items left on the surface will remain intact… for the millions of years to come. They will stand as frozen testimonies: evidence of us, our past and our craving for exploration.

On Earth, very few of our cultural artefacts are expected to survive that long.

Mankind itself is very likely to evolve or disappear.

A Brief Vignette Of Humanity

Forty five years after Apollo 17, a mission lead by PT scientists and Audi will visit this last landing site, the Lunar Rover, the descent stage, the traces left by men on the sand of our Satellite.

Created in 2007, the mission of the Google Lunar XPRIZE is to incentivize space entrepreneurs to create a new era of affordable access to the Moon and beyond.

The Audi Moon Rovers
will also cary a message :
the Sanctuary

The competition’s $30 million prize purse will be awarded to teams who are able to land a privately funded rover on the moon, travel 500 meters, and transmit back high definition video and images. Today, PT Scientists from Germany are 1 of 5 teams favored to land twin rovers on the Moon until 2017.

Like the Lunar Plaques left by the Apollo missions, the Audi Moon Rovers will also cary a message : the Sanctuary.
A message intended for our descendants, in the millions of years to come.

Shall they visit —once more- the plains of Taurus Littrow, they will have a brief understanding of our epoch and our epic.

knowledge

 

 


Passing our knowledge
on to future generations
requires transcending
a horizon set by our life
span which isolates us
from a distant future.

Roland Lehoucq

 

 

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SANCTUARIZED

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SANCTUARY

In the early twentieth century, Paul Valéry said “We later civilizations now know that we are mortal.” The great physicist Richard Feynman, winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965, was also aware that ours is a fragile species. He wondered what single phrase could preserve a maximum amount of information for future generations if every bit of scientific knowledge were to disappear in a catastrophe.
To the nagging question of our own disappearance, Feynman answered by imagining passing our understanding of the world on to our descendants. He suggested: “All things are made of atoms—little particles that move around in perpetual motion,  attracting each other when they are a little distance apart, but repelling upon being squeezed into one another.”

 

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If we put forth a little thought and imagination, this phrase contains a great deal of information. Passing our knowledge on to future generations requires transcending a horizon set by our life span which isolates us from a distant future. Crossing over this time barrier could mean constructing a new ecology of knowledge.
The Sanctuary project proposes to add a stone to achieving this ambition by using an inalterable medium to pass on a mapping of our representations of the Universe. Along with creating a link between humans in the present and humans in the future, this time capsule will also—and especially—make it possible for humans in the present to take a step back and think about the ties they have to space, to time… and to others.

 

team-members

TEAM MEMBERS

Roland Lehoucq

Roland Lehoucq


Astrophyscist, CEA
Professor,
École-Polytechnique
Benoît Faiveley

Benoît Faiveley


Documentary film
maker, GRAPEVINE
Gallery owner
Jean-Philippe Uzan

Jean-Philippe Uzan


Astrophysicist,
mathematician,
IAP / CNRS
Emmanuel Pietriga

Emmanuel Pietriga


Senior research scientist,
project Massive Data, INRIA
Stefano Panebianco

Stefano Panebianco


Nuclear and particle
physicist, CEA
Martin Krzywinski

Martin Krzywinski


Bioinformatics, genome
and data visualisation,
BC Cancer Agency
Lewis Dartnell

Lewis Dartnell


Research Scientist / UK Space Agency
Nicolas Baker

Nicolas Baker


Documentary film maker
Roland Lehoucq

Roland Lehoucq


Astrophyscist, CEA
Professor,
École-Polytechnique
Benoît Faiveley

Benoît Faiveley


Documentary film
maker, GRAPEVINE
Gallery owner
Jean-Philippe Uzan

Jean-Philippe Uzan


Astrophysicist,
mathematician,
IAP / CNRS
Emmanuel Pietriga

Emmanuel Pietriga


Senior research scientist,
project Massive Data, INRIA
Stefano Panebianco

Stefano Panebianco


Nuclear and particle
physicist, CEA
Martin Krzywinski

Martin Krzywinski


Bioinformatics, genome
and data visualisation,
BC Cancer Agency
Lewis Dartnell

Lewis Dartnell


Research Scientist / UK Space Agency
Nicolas Baker

Nicolas Baker


Documentary film maker
snoopy

 

 

 


Since the 1950’s,
Humanity has opened
the doors to Eternity.

Benoît Faiveley

 

 

 

”Snoopy“ and a Saturn V S-IVB Tank in heliocentric orbit

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partners

PARTNERS